F-150 Scam

Exact email…
“Hello,

Thank you for your interest in purchasing my 2005 Ford F-150 KING RANCH . I am selling this F-150 because I am in the military and my unit will be sent out of country. I don’t want it get old in my garage. The price is low because I need to sell it before next month. The F-150 is in pristine condition, no accident history, clear title. Always adult driven and garaged, never abused or raced. If you are interested, it’s still available for sale and the price, as stated in the ad, is $2.500. Let me know if you are interested, email back.

Here you have more pictures http://imgur.com/a/SSkwf
Vehicle title – Clean
Mileage – 118,200
Transmission – Automatic
Engine – 8 Cylinder 5.4 Liter
Fuel type – Gasoline

I look forward to hearing from you,
Julia”

–found a craigslist post, sent an email asking when they could meet, got this response. Replied we could meet to see the vehicle with cash in the morning. They responded…

“Hello again,

Right now I’m in a military base (Wichita ,KS) and my F-150 is sealed and stored in our Military Deposit, ready for shipping. Now we are training, getting ready to leave the country. For this potential deal to go smoothly the delivery process will be manage by me, on my costs and you can have my F-150 in front of your door in maximum 3 working days. Also it will come with all papers and reg. in order.
I’ve agreed with Market Place on facebook to take care of this transaction as third part on it. They will receive and process your payment until you get my truck. You’ll also have 5 working days of testing it and until they get the final answer of you keeping my truck I will be able to receive your payment from them. I need to know if you are interested so I can ask Market Place to send you the details on this deal.

For this deal to be close I will need from you a reply with : your full legal name, postal code, the address where you want to be delivered and also a valid phone number where you can be reached.

Please keep me posted with your final decision so I’ll know what to do next,

Thanks,
Julia”

When things seem too good to be true, they’re normally too good to be true.

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